A Real Update

Farm life can ruff.

So much has happened since my last post. I started a new job and I an learning to be a dialysis nurse. I have had a heart attack and triple bypass, and a few other health mishaps we shall call them. But I am still here, kicking and finally getting the farm, though only as a supervisor because of a health mishap, fully underway.

Going in the right direction.

Our current projects include modifying the new barn to accommodate the chickens and goats. Getting fencing up around the new field. Which includes a pond for our silly ducks. And getting our garden beds prepared. We also have seed starts in the greenhouse.

It’s a hen party.

For those of you that get our not so monthly, monthly newsletter, or on one of our customer emails may have seen that after last year’s abysmal garden we decided not to do a CSA program. We keep tossing it around, especially of late. What we will do is send out an email when we have a surplus of produce. The same with eggs. I will be setting up forms on our Contact page so that you can let us know which list you would like to be on.

I will attempt to post more often and get the newsletter out in a more timely fashion.

Tammy ~SSM~

What is in Your Herb Garden?

Herbs are perhaps one of my favorite plants to grow. They are easy, useful, and beautiful. They make the perfect addition to any flower bed or vegetable garden.

I use fresh and dried herbs in many of the soaps, lotions, and salves that I make.  When any of us cook here we use very little salt and flavor with our herbs. It makes the need for salt so much less and the food taste so much better. I also make herbal teas and herbal tea jellies from them as well.

What are your favorite herbs to grow?

I currently have the following growing:

  • Lavender
  • Rosemary
  • Thyme
  • Oregano
  • 3 different kinds of mint
  • Lemon Balm
  • Tarragon
  • Chives
  • Basil
  • Sage
  • Parsley
  • Dill
  • Lemon Grass
  • Bee Balm

Right now things are still in pots, in the greenhouse or have actually made it to the herb garden. We have so many projects going on at one time that it is just plain crazy here some days. I am very proud of the fact that I was able to start most from seed instead of buying plants. For the first time I have actually grown lavender and rosemary from seed. I think having the little greenhouse is the key to that.

If you don’t have a greenhouse or are a beginner with growing herbs I recommend purchasing plants or herb growing kits.  The beauty of herbs is that they do not have to take up a lot of space and they will grow in most well drained soil. I have successfully grown them as container plants, window sill gardens, and in the soil.

The amount of sunlight needed varies between plants but I have noticed over the years that if you plant the larger plants to the back of your garden and then move forward to your smaller and annual plants you have much more success. They definitely need to have water, the soil should always at least feel damp to the touch. A nice rich compost mulched around the base of the plants ensures proper nutrients and moisture.

Enjoy your herbs, one of the most versatile plants on earth.

Light, Love, and Peace

Tammy ~SSM~

The Incredible Rosemary


Common Name
Standardized: rosemary

Latin name: Rosemarinus officinalis

Plant Family:
Lamiaceae (mint)

Overview

This is a woody, perennial plant with a 2 year life span, or so I have heard, mine typically live for several years. It is native to the Mediterranean and a member of the mint family.
It is a fragrant addition to your herb garden. It looks like an evergreen with small pointed leaves, that look like spines. It needs well composted, draining soil and mulching if overwintered outside. It produces small white or blue flowers in the summer.
This is a great addition to food like pork, lamb, game, poultry, and fish. It has medicinal properties as well and can be used in skin care products as well. It is a good source of iron, calcium and Vitamin B-6.

Cultivation and Harvesting

It is a wood plant that can be grown from seed but does best as cuttings. It enjoys growing in containers as well as out in the garden. Containers can be brought in during cold weather, however, rosemary does not like to be transplanted.
Typically just the leaves are harvested throughout the growing season. Some have been known to harvest the stems to use as skewers for kabobs. The leaves can be dried and stored for use later on. I will cut what I feel I need for drying and hang upside down over a screen.

Common Uses:

  • Dried
    • Seasoning food
    • Teas
    • Soaps
    • Salves
  • Fresh
    • Seasoning food
    • Air Fresheners
    • Infused to oils, butters, etc

Medicinal Uses:

  • Relief from anxiety
  • Indigestion
  • Headache
  • Joint pain
  • Cold and flu
  • Poor circulation
  • Skin Care
  • Oral Health

Disclaimer:

Should not be used by pregnant women except in cooking.
Always consult with a qualified healthcare practioner before using herbal products. If you are pregnant, nursing or have medical conditions and are on prescribed medications this is essential.
This information is for educational purposes only not to be used to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease. None of this information has been evaluated by the FDA.