Garden House Plans

Learn how I am going to revolutionize year round growing both sustainably and effectively.

What I wish it could look like.

Garden House

I don’t want my garden house to be confused with a traditional greenhouse. It is totally not my intention to create something traditional but something unique. The garden house will allow me to grow produce year round, have a sacred space to escape to, and allow me to work to build my well care center and apothecary. 750 square feet of peace and beauty. My new personal definition of a garden house is a small building that contains a garden and work space that is sustainable and earth friendly.

Design

The foundation of the building will be 25’x30’, hence 750 square feet. The location will have to be excavated a little bit to allow for more even ground. The next step will be to frame the house. The base of the walls and the window and door frames will be made from wood. The roof structure will be a combination of wood and pvc pipe. Windows will be glass and window screen as will the door. Early on in development it will look like a greenhouse but as time goes by it will look more like a cottage on the edge of the woods.

Front of the garden house.

The exterior will be surrounded by perennial garden beds for those edibles that require cold stratification in order to grow. To the rear there will be at least one honey beehive that will have an entrance to the inside of the garden house as well as the world at large. Decor of wind chimes, hanging baskets, bird bath, etc. will be included in each garden bed. This is not going to be a small undertaking.

The interior will have two 10×10 rooms to the back of the building. One will be a sitting room/meditation space. A calming, peaceful place to meet with clients to consult with them regarding their well care. Well care you ask? That is another conversation entirely. The sitting room will also be used as an officeThe other room will be a work room with a potting bench, space for drying/curing herbs and spices, creating tinctures, oils, lotions, etc. The space between the two rooms will house tools, worm compost bins, and other maintenance/service machinery and equipment. The will be praying mantis houses for raising these beneficial insects and butterfly houses as well. Hatch, raise, and release for the butterflies to help with dwindling population. 

Side view of garden house.

The flooring will be done with a garden fabric base, a layer of sand and pea sized gravel topped with paving stones to make a smooth surface that also allows for water drainage. A smooth surface is important so that people with mobility issues can still come and enjoy. The two rooms will be screened off to give a feeling of privacy. Other structures will include 2’x3’x1.5’ raised beds, as well as vertical growing boxes. All style growing beds will be set on risers to eliminate as much bending and twisting as possible. Again, this is to make it possible for people with mobility issues to enjoy the benefits of gardening. 

Water and power needs will be via sustainable methods. Having paid attention to the weather patterns of the last two or three years we seem to get quite a bit of rain, usually at the most inopportune times. So there will be a water catchment system developed, along with a filtration system so that I do not need to tap into our well. I will also be using a very basic solar set up to bring power to the garden house.

Interior layout

The Purpose

The purpose or the combined mission and vision of the garden house is more complicated than just growing food and herbs for my family. I want it to be my office, work space, clinic, apothecary, and education center for my family and my community. I do foresee some expansions in years to come as our society changes and more people are in need of services currently not readily available. 

I will be raising funds for this venture through several different methods. One is simply from current employment. Another is through sales of Herbal Academy goods and services. The sale of Cinderite organic soil amendment. And Paypal donations. 

That is it for today folks.

A Real Update

Farm life can ruff.

So much has happened since my last post. I started a new job and I an learning to be a dialysis nurse. I have had a heart attack and triple bypass, and a few other health mishaps we shall call them. But I am still here, kicking and finally getting the farm, though only as a supervisor because of a health mishap, fully underway.

Going in the right direction.

Our current projects include modifying the new barn to accommodate the chickens and goats. Getting fencing up around the new field. Which includes a pond for our silly ducks. And getting our garden beds prepared. We also have seed starts in the greenhouse.

It’s a hen party.

For those of you that get our not so monthly, monthly newsletter, or on one of our customer emails may have seen that after last year’s abysmal garden we decided not to do a CSA program. We keep tossing it around, especially of late. What we will do is send out an email when we have a surplus of produce. The same with eggs. I will be setting up forms on our Contact page so that you can let us know which list you would like to be on.

I will attempt to post more often and get the newsletter out in a more timely fashion.

Tammy ~SSM~

Make Your Own Household Cleaners

Part of becoming sustainable is getting back to basics and making much of our needed supplies ourselves. I have made laundry soap before and for a lot less than what the stores sell it. That is a really old post actually. It is complete with video, well video of sorts. I haven’t gotten into making those yet but hopefully I will as things settle into routine on the farmstead. This isn’t so much about chemicals, I am still addicted to bleach and its smell, it’s a nurse thing, but about saving money. The fewer chemicals in my home is an added bonus. I will share my recipes in future posts, as well making available some of the products for sale.

Things I Keep On Hand to Make Cleaners

Cleaning Tools

What Can I Make With All of This?

  • Laundry Soap
  • Fabric Softener
  • Disinfecting Cleaner
  • Dish Soap (I still handwash)
  • Furniture Polish
  • Electronics Cleaner
  • Glass Cleaner

5 Tips for Garden Planning

 

 

Battle Cat says that he is ready for spring too! He has cat business to attend to and you just can’t do that when it is cold and wet out. If I haven’t introduced him yet to you all he is 1/3 of the Salt & Pepper Gang. The other two members are Koda and Blizzard.  I know such a mean looking gang aren’t they? The hole was the dogs’ contribution today to working around the house. They dug up freshly turned soil and layed down in it. But I digress, I did say 5 tips for garden planning didn’t I? Of course I did. Gardens are best planned out to offer the most success. Dream big when thinking about what you want to grow. You can narrow it down and then plan on expanding as time goes on.

Tip #1

Find the perfect spot. You want some where that gets 8 to 10 hours of sun per day. You will also it to have good natural drainage so that water doesn’t pool in any one area.

Tip #2

Test your soil! I cannot stress this one enough. You will need to take samples from the whole spot. It is a good idea to go through your local co-op extension office. They will test the sample for free and give you a good break down of what is needed in your soil. Often they have what you need to collect the samples. You can also purchases all kinds of soil testers in garden centers and on amazon.com.

Tip #3

Check your growing zone. The USDA Plant Hardiness Zone will help you get a general idea of what your growing season looks like. There is even a function now that let’s you put in your zip code so you can get very specific.

Tip #4

Write a list of every vegetable you want to ever grow. Then narrow it down to what you think you can handle for the season. This may mean the basics such as tomatoes, cucumbers, beans, squash, etc. But don’t toss that list, you will get to it eventually.

Tip #5

Start amending your soil before you even think about doing anything. Based upon the

results of your soil testing of course. Some basic things to use that will help all gardens are compost, manure, lime, and potash (not grill left overs unless you are using wood, charcoal is a no go for the garden).

 

 

 

Light, Love, and Peace
~Tammy~SSM